Background

NTNU Ocean Week is the annual conference hosted by NTNU Oceans, one of NTNU’s four strategic research areas. NTNU Ocean Week contributes to Norway’s role as an ocean nation by exploring groundbreaking interdisciplinary ocean research and collaboration on sustainability challenges. Last year, for the first time, NTNU Ocean Week expanded the conference to reach out to all three campus cities of NTNU: Trondheim, Ålesund, and Gjørvik. This year, the event includes The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS) which is partly governed through participation of NTNU, making UNIS an "extra" campus of NTNU.


By expanding NTNU Ocean Week's reach to include UNIS in efforts to explore interdisciplinary ocean research, the event supports collaboration on sustainability challenges of the oceans and the Arctic. In addition to support from NTNU Oceans, the gathering is financially co-sponsored by UC Berkeley's Peder Sather Center for Advanced Study with the goal of fostering long-lasting collaboration among the three institutions - NTNU, UC Berkeley, UNIS.


Click this link to learn more about NTNU Ocean Week 2023


This is a public event taking place at The University Centre in Svalbard located in the town of Longyearbyen. If you want to participate or attend any of the activities and presentations please send an email listed in the "Contact" page of this website. More information regarding Format and Schedule will be uploaded soon.

Making Use of Arctic Science

Our gathering will connect 20 visiting participants with researchers at UNIS, artists, and community members on Svalbard, while strengthening capacity on interdisciplinary and international research for NTNU Oceans. Our selection of Svalbard as a meeting place extends NTNU Ocean Week to include our partner organization UNIS and to explore the surroundings of this unique natural, cultural, political environment.


The event relates to critical knowledges, oceans sustainability, and resources development in an open-ended collaboration of the three co-sponsoring institutions - NTNU, UC Berkeley, UNIS - and framed under the rubric: "Making Use of Arctic Science". The event will consider the importance of Oceans and Arctic research in and for policy-making, enhancing public trust, education, as well as coastal community members who are co-participants in the construction of multidisciplinary sciences.


The "use-value" of Arctic Science


Various “Late Industrial” themes such as vulnerability, financialization, and the loss of life associated to increasing climate change and social transitions are prompting science practitioners to reflect on the depletion of the Earth and the possibilities for rebuilding "Value" through various modes of aesthetics, ethics, artistic practice, and social justice. Such effort requires collaboration not only across different science disciplines but involving advanced practices in policy, the arts, and community. 


"Value" when talking about economic or political affairs, which are all those human endeavors directed toward obtaining money or control is different from "Social Values" which cannot be compared to anything because each is considered unique and incommensurable. Thus, Making Use of Arctic Science deliberates on creating wealth and strategic knowledge but equally on creating sociability with the aim of Knowledge for a Better World.